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Boo...

This week, we've all been pounded (not in a Matt Stairs kind of way) with news about Alex Rodriguez and his positive test for performance enhancing drugs. Rodriguez came clean, in an interview with ESPN's Peter Gammons, admitting that he took steroids for at least 3 seasons while playing for Texas, and admitting that he lied in previous interviews when asked about it.

The test results were to remain anonymous, thus MLB is unable to punish Rodriguez over the maliciously released news. Instead, Commission Bud Selig can only chastise Rodriguez, saying that he has shamed the game.

Rodriguez's confession has also drawn concern from the management of the Yankees. General Manager Brian Cashman stated, "I'm not confident about anything, about anybody." And manager Joe Girardi expressed his desire to keep a closer eye on players that he has concerns about.

Alex Rodriguez is a cheater. Much like a cheater in school or in a relationship. Is the cheater sorry when he/she is getting A grades on exams? No. Is the cheater sorry when he/she is enjoying that side action? Not a bit. Is the cheater sorry when he's winning American League MVP awards? Also no. That considered, he is not the only cheater in baseball these days. Remember Jason Giambi and Gary Sheffield were named in the BALCO scandal as having used illegal steroids. And while steroids are the most prevalent drugs of this baseball era, players of yester-year, like Willie Stargell and Phillies Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt are long rumored to have dabbled with methamphetamine.

The cheater, in this case, is not to blame. Schools have rules and punishments for cheaters. Husbands, wives and the law have rules and penalties for cheaters. Major League Baseball has only recently began with more strict rules and impactful punishments for players who cheat. Blame baseball for this. Don't hold Albatross Rodriguez fully responsible for how he has tainted the game. It's this organization of MLB, that wants its hitters to hit and hit big, that needs to be held accountable for the disappointing state of stats, players, records, and this era of the game we love.

Can it be fixed? I truly don't think fans will be confident that Major League Baseball is really on the road to improving itself until a new commissioner is in place. Can a true fan trust that the Selig regime can, and will, do what's in the best interest of the integrity of baseball? Commissioner Selig said, this week, "We are fully committed to ridding our game of steroids and other performance-enhancing substances. These drugs and those who use them and facilitate their use threaten the integrity of our sport." Prove it or get out.

Comments

Jay Floyd said…
Don't miss the Wednesday post from PhilliesFlow.com.

http://www.philliesflow.com/2009/02/11/some-problems-run-so-deep-they-cant-even-be-solved-by-replacing-the-guy-with-the-089-ratio/

The writer there really get in depth with numbers.
Chris said…
Phillies Flow is probably the top Phils blog out there. They're pretty much unrivaled, IMO.

Since you're not pure Phillies, of course. :)


As for this post, I just wonder why we value records so much.
Anonymous said…
it'll be a tough road ahead for A-Roid as he seeks to become A-Rod once again

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