Monday, March 30, 2020

PhoulBallz Interview: RHP Addison Russ on MLB spring training

Addison Russ, image- Jay Floyd
Righty hurler Addison Russ looked great for the Phillies in this year's spring exhibition season.  Due to the pro sports hiatus caused by the coronavirus pandemic, his efforts were cut short, however.

In six relief appearances this spring the 25-year-old notched a 1-0 record, a 1.59 ERA and a .263 batting average against.

Last year in 55 appearances with Double-A Reading, Russ, who was the Phillies' 19th round draft selection out of Houston Baptist in 2017, posted a 5-6 record with 22 saves, a 2.54 ERA and a 12.9 K/9 mark. 

Anxious for baseball to get rolling again, Russ talked with me this week, offering feedback on his time around the big league team this spring, his production in Grapefruit League play, his uniform number, how the break in the schedule impacts his progress and more.

Read ahead for remarks and insight from Russ.


- What did you do over the off-season to prepare for the 2020 campaign? And did the invitation to big league spring training alter your plans or routine?


I try to stick to the same routine every off-season.  I take some time off and let the arm and body recover and then slowly work back into my throwing routine. Usually, around Thanksgiving I will start throwing again and ramp it up as weeks go on. The invite to big league camp altered the plans in a positive way, I went into my bullpen phase earlier and got the arm going quicker since I had less time to report.


- You performed well in Grapefruit League action.  Can you share some thoughts on the results and is it what you expected?

The success I’ve had is just from trusting my stuff and trusting the  defense behind me. You’re in a big league game with big league defenders  behind you so it’s awesome being on the mound knowing that the best of  the best are behind you to help in every way that they can. It’s been  more than I could expect. It’s been surreal.

- You were wearing number 69 from what I've seen. Nice. There's some humor tied to that jersey number. What's the vibe when getting assigned that number? Meaning- would guys rather not get it or maybe is there fun attention where other guys say they want it instead?


It’s definitely fun.  There is always some fun when you get to see what number you are given. Mine just happened to be a number that has some ties to it and some guys definitely wish they had it instead.


- Is there a Phils coach and/or a Phils teammate this spring that helped you a lot or that you've learned the most from?

I’ve kind of just been open ears to everyone. Being in the clubhouse with those guys is awesome. There is so much experience when you look around you and so much knowledge to learn so I really just tried to take all of it in! 

For the complete version of this interview, please visit my Patreon page and consider supporting my work.  Your membership will get you access to exclusive interviews as well as early access to other news and features. 

Saturday, March 28, 2020

PhoulBallz Interview: RHP Trevor Bettencourt talks rehab, baseball shutdown, more

Trevor Bettencourt, image- Jay Floyd
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Righty pitcher Trevor Bettencourt continues to recover from his second Tommy John surgery, but instead of rehabbing at the Phillies spring training complex in Florida, he's at home in California, because of the halt of professional sports due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Last year, just two appearances into his 2019 campaign with the Double-A Reading, Bettencourt's season was cut short, as he was dealing with arm trouble.

In his professional career to date, the 25-year-old sports a 7-3 record with 12 saves, a 3.38 ERA and .273 batting average against and an 11.3 K/9 mark in 69 relief appearances.

A 25th round draft selection in 2016, Bettencourt first went under the knife for UCL reconstruction after his sophomore season in college in 2014.

This week I talked with the man known as "T-Betty" about his recovery, how the closure of the Phils' facilities impacts his rehabilitation, recommendations to pass time for people in quarantine and more.  Read ahead for that interview.


- How is recovery going from last year's elbow injury?

It’s going really well, feeling pretty good and it’s nice having the Phillies staff in your corner. I had to do a lot of throwing into a net alone for my first surgery. Including other rehab activities because of the transfer rule at the time. So pretty happy with where I am at the moment in rehab, not happy about this baseball hiatus (laughs).

- How does the baseball shutdown impact your training or rehab? What's the plan for how you will proceed?

I mean it sucks, it really does, but like happy Gilmore said, “It happens”. “ What? Sh*t?”. “Yup”.  But I’ve been finding ways to get what I need done and have been staying in contact with the trainers and athletic staff to stay on top of everything. Currently just doing everything I can at home, might be going to stay with my buddy Daulton Jefferies (A’s) to do some workouts and (physical therapy).

- Are any injured or rehab guys staying in Florida and working at the team's facilities?

To be honest not completely sure. I believe everyone is at home getting their work in.

- Do you have hopes that the big league teams will work something out to make sure minor leaguers will not miss wages? Have you heard anything with that?

I haven’t really heard anything besides yeah, possibly still getting spring training money. I do really hope they get something together to help guys out though.  It’s tough.  A lot of people don’t understand that we really don’t make a sustainable living on just baseball. And then others argue that we are choosing this, which I understand but wouldn’t you too if you had a real chance at your goal? Either way, it’s just a difficult time for everyone involved.

- I know some fans are worried about the players.  Is there anything that fans should know about this situation and how the minor league guys have been treated?

Not exactly sure what to say (laughs), but in reality it’s a tough time on everyone. Just pay it forward I guess the best you can, because there’s people out there really struggling right now.

- What recommendations do you have for people that are locked down at home as far as TV shows to binge or books to read or games to play?

I’ve been really hooked on this show called “Worth It” on Hulu and “Basic Skills Challenge”.  It’s about food and cooking. I’m weird, so not sure how popular those are (laughs) but I like to cook, so those kind of shows.  And I’m re-watching New Girl at the moment. 

Also I'm a big video game guy.  If anyone thinks they can beat Jakob Hernandez and I at Rocket League, we would love the challenge.

- Is there anything I haven't asked about that you want to share?

Just want to share this page on Twitter right now called Adopt a Minor League @adoptmilbplayer.
It’s an organization set up by a guy who understands what struggles minor league players go through. He collects donations and provides everyday essentials for minor leaguers who struggle to make ends meet. It’s a really cool thing that’s starting to get some attention and I think that would be really cool to help get more attention to that idea. His page can explain more than I can do.  I’ll leave it there.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

PhoulBallz Interview: Jeff Singer talks spring training, coronavirus hiatus, more

Jeff Singer, image- Jay Floyd
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Local Philly guy Jeff Singer is back in his home region due to the coronavirus outbreak and the delay it has caused to the 2020 season.  Prior to the pre-season being halted, the 26-year-old got some time on the bump with the big league team in spring training.

In Grapefruit League player, the lefty pitcher notched two scoreless appearances for the Phillies this spring.

Last season in 42 relief outings with Double-A Reading Singer, who was signed as a free agent in 2015, posted a 7-0 record with three saves, a 2.34 ERA, a 10.8 K/9 mark and a .180 batting average against.

Last week, I talked with Singer, who shared his thoughts on his time around the Phillies this spring, his current training situation, the baseball hiatus and more.  Read ahead for that full interview. 


- What can you share thoughts about how the hiatus for the baseball schedule caused by the coronavirus pandemic will impact your training or progress?

This is a tough situation for everyone and it’s something that no one in baseball ever went through. As for my training I’m going to be doing anything I can to stay in shape. 
I will be going to Scanzano Sports Center in Cherry Hill to throw and lift. I’ll be doing my running there and also outside. Most likely be doing workouts in my front or back yard.

- Do you have thoughts to provide on the disruption to your expected baseball related income?  

When I first got home I was setting up lessons and training sessions at the facility. I’m not sure if that’s going to be possible with the possible quarantine that can happen in the next few days. Obviously as a minor leaguer any money you can make is important and I’m sure a bunch of us are curious when the next time we get paid could be.

- Seems that the 40-man roster guys will be getting paid during this break...and I read that MLB has committed money to financially help ballpark employees during the down time.  As an employee of the team, in the developmental ranks, what are your feelings about being left out or having an unclear resolution?

I’m sure the MLB will be taking care of us soon. I understand helping out the big league guys and 40 man first. That’s where the money is. As for the employees at the ball parks, I think that is amazing that they are being helped out.

- What types of workout plans do you have for the downtime?  Training with any other pro players?  

As of right now I will be training by myself and basically throwing at a net or wall, as I usually do during the off-season. If I have a bullpen I will have a one of the catchers at the facility come catch me and give him a few bucks.

- I saw that you got some experience in big league spring training games this year.  Can you describe the experience of playing in Grapefruit League games and enjoying success?  

This was my fifth Spring Training and I pitched in my first Grapefruit League game in 2017.  I felt this year was the most comfortable I felt in one of them games. Definitely two outings I will never forget.

- Was there anyone, like a coach or a teammate, that you were excited to get exposure to with the big club?  

It was great to meet and talk to (Joe) Girardi and (Bryan) Price. I was able to get some exposure in front of them and show them what I can do.

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Phils prospect Barber staying positive during baseball's hiatus

Albertus Barber, image- Jay Floyd
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If you simply mind the masses on social networking platforms, you'd think minor league players are really getting the shaft as baseball, among other sports, has shut down completely while the world deals with the coronavirus pandemic.  That's not the case in every prospect's mind.

While there were recently loads of people advocating for teams to pay their minor league talent as it became clear that members of each big league club's 40-man roster won't miss a payday and that stadium staffers can expect to be taken care of as well, some individuals in the minors already feel like they are being compensated quite well.

Pitcher Albertus Barber is perfectly happy with every single bit of treatment by his parent club to date, as the Phillies are still hosting many out-of-towners in Clearwater, FL, while their baseball and training facilities are closed.

"They’re taking care of us like kings and giving us everything we need," Barber stated. "For those unable to go back home we’re still getting paid and receiving three meals a day."

The players that get to stay are being put up in a local hotel and get three daily meals covered by the organization. The designations for which individuals get to stay don't seem to be strict, but it's for players who can't go home or don't have homes to go to, mostly international players.

Some players balked at the initial announcement that Major League Baseball confirmed that players would receive their weekly allowances up to April 8th. That total would vary, but was said to be roughly be $80 per player. Barber, however, isn't bothered by that and is confident that the Phillies will continue to do right by its promising young players.

Arrangements from April 9th and beyond are yet to be announced.

Asked why the reactions might vary so much between different players, the right-hander's response was emphatic.

"'Cause I don't give a (damn) about money," Barber shared starkly. "I’ve wanted to live this dream my whole life, man. As long as you give me a food and a bed, or at least the money to cover that, I’ll be happy. All I give a (crap) about is playing ball."

Some players may have families to support, loan payments or other bills so an interruption to compensation could potentially be cause for alarm, Barber's not one of those guys. He's fully satisfied with his status, citing a decades-long path that put him exactly where he is today.

"My whole entire life has been planned around this and only this. Since I was, like, four years old," the 24-year-old said. "I assessed and calculated every single risk and move I could and couldn't take by the time I was 19 and realistically, everything else can wait. I'm busy."

Barber was signed as an undrafted free agent by the Phillies for $1000 in 2019 after sitting out since the previous year, because he was declared ineligible after taking online college courses following the 2018 MLB draft.

Combined at three levels (Rookie level Gulf Coast League, short-season Class A Williamsport and Class A Lakewood), Barber tallied a 4-0 record with a save, a 0.87 ERA, a .222 batting average against and a 10.0 K/9 average in 14 relief appearances.

The forethought that went into all of the Oklahoma native's devising includes not consuming alcohol (barring an occasional social obligation), running multiple side hustles including working as a janitor and selling personal belongings that he didn't need, including his own car.

All of those things allow Barber to support himself and maximize his chances of being a professional athlete, describing his situation like scraping to start a new business. Eliminating distractions and things that weren't beneficial to his ultimate goal of trying to compete at the professional level aren't always convenient, but he's confident that it's all worth it.

"One day you’re making a lot of money, or you fail, but that’s the beauty of it. The point is, (screw) it. Sacrifices are (freaking) awesome if you end up making it. So give it all up, make it 'life or death', and go take what’s yours."

Sunday, March 22, 2020

PhoulBallz Q&A: What did you stock up on?

With a global pandemic going on, society is on lockdown with many local governments issuing orders to stay at home and for employers to allow their staff to work from home.

This week I reached out to some familiar names to see how they prepared to be hunkered down at home for extended periods of time.  Included in the group that I surveyed are baseball players, a professional wrestling champion, a recording artist as well as the radio voice of a local team.

I asked, "What did you 'panic shop' for or what did you stock up on with all of this going on?"  Read ahead for the responses I got.

Dom Pipkin, image- Jay Floyd
Pitching prospect Dominic Pipkin: We did a little shopping, but it wasn't like hoarders grocery edition or anything.  We got a normal amount of snacks and stuff to eat and we already had toilet paper, so we didn't buy that.

Pitching prospect Jonathan Hennigan, who hunts and fishes:  Man, no.  I got plenty of deer meat, fish and hog meat to eat!  Got plenty of toilet paper.  All is well.

Pitcher Tyler Viza, who spent last season with Double-A Reading and Triple-A Lehigh Valley: Luckily, my family and I had already been getting stuff from the stores before anything even hit the United States.  Luckily, for me, I've been working at Starbucks the last few off-seasons and they had a bunch of sanitizer wipes, so I was able to get those even after they flew off the shelves.

Pitching prospect Luke Leftwich: We haven't really freaked out.  Just getting the essentials; bread, eggs, coffee.

Minor league pitcher Trevor Bettencourt: By the time I got home, there wasn't much opportunity to stock up. I (got some) meat and cereal.

Impact Wrestling X-Division Champion Ace Austin:  Not really, but my roommates did.  They didn't go overboard, but got enough to hold the four of us over.

Trenton Thunder media relations director and play by play broadcaster Jon Mozes: I stocked up on frozen pizzas.  Super easy to make and can last for more than one meal.  And whiskey.  Always need more whiskey at times like this.

Lastly, hip hop artist P-Lane served up this brief text response:  Guns, ammo, food.  LOL

Thursday, March 12, 2020

Baseball season on hold due to pandemic

Minor League Baseball followed suit with Major League baseball, delaying the start of the 2020 season due to the risk off illness related to the coronavirus.

Per a release from MiLB:

“In light of the current coronavirus outbreak, and after consultation with medical professionals and our partners at Major League Baseball, Minor League Baseball will delay the start of the 2020 Championship Season. We will continue to monitor the developments and will announce additional information about the 2020 season at a later date. We will work with Major League Baseball and our community partners to resume play as soon as it is safe to do so. The health and safety of Minor League Baseball fans, players and executives is our top priority, and our thoughts are with those around the world who have been affected by this outbreak.”

It's unclear why Minor League Baseball would refer to the season as "the 2020 Championship Season".

In a press release, the Phillies' Double-A affiliate, the Reading Fightin Phils stated the following:

"The R-Phils will keep our fans and partners updated as any further developments occur. Rest assured that the R-Phils will do right by our fans and partners as we all navigate these uncharted waters together."

Additionally, the remainder of the big league spring training schedule has been cancelled, as has the minor league exhibition schedule. 

Per a source, it remains a possibility that there could be exhibition games played before the regular season at various levels begins.

Saturday, March 7, 2020

2020 Phillies Prospects Countdown: #1 RHP Spencer Howard

I invite you to visit Patreon.com/PhoulBallz in order to support my work and get access to material like this before anyone.  Plus you'll get exclusive interviews as well as other content you won't be able to enjoy anywhere else.  I could use, and I would value, your backing.

Spencer Howard, image- Jay Floyd
Right-handed pitcher Spencer Howard is this outlet’s choice as the Phillies’ top overall prospect. Howard was the team’s second round draft selection in 2017 (45th overall) out of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and has proven to be an exceptional hurler in his time in the minor leagues.

In college, in his draft year/sophomore season, Howard sported an 8-1 record with a 1.95 ERA and a 10 K/9 mark over 17 appearances (12 starts) for the Mustangs. As a red shirt freshman the previous year, he posted a 2.95 ERA in 21 appearances (two starts).

After signing his first professional contract, Howard debuted with Class A short-season Williamsport, where he notched a 1-1 record with a 4.45 ERA and a .214 batting average against while striking out 40 and walking 18 in 28 1/3 innings in nine starts. Following the regular season, he participated in the Florida Instructional League.

Howard felt great levels of comfort with his Lakewood teammates, describing his situation as being among “good-ass dudes playing some baseball”. While there, he experienced some highs and some lows, as he notched a 1.89 ERA in four April starts, then came back down to Earth to sport an 8.79 ERA in four May starts for the BlueClaws.

He turned a corner, however, in late June. Starting with a six-inning, no-run, 10 strike out performance against Hagerstown on June 29th, Howard would post a 1.52 ERA over his final 11 starts of the regular season. The success didn’t end there, as Howard had the best day of his life in the post-season, clinching his team’s trip to the South Atlantic League finals by tossing a nine-inning no-hitter against division rival Kannapolis.

Overall, in 23 regular season starts with Lakewood, Howard tallied a 9-8 record with a 3.78 ERA with an 11.8 K/9 mark and a .240 batting average against.

In 2019, Howard opened his campaign with Class A Advanced Clearwater, where he was sidelined with a shoulder injury just four starts into his season.  After roughly two months on the shelf, Howard returned to the mound.  In total, he made seven starts with Clearwater, posting a 2-1 record with 1.29 ERA, a .162 batting average against and a 12.3 K/9 mark.

Howard was promoted to Double-A Reading in July, making six regular season starts there, collecting a 1-0 record with a 2.35 ERA, a .180 batting average against as well as an 11.2 K/9 mark. 

Over the most recent off-season, Howard made up for some of that lost time by participating in the Arizona Fall League, where he faced many of baseball's top minor league talents.  In six appearances for the Scorpions, Howard notched a 1-1 record with a 2.11 ERA and a 0.94 WHIP.  Additionally, he struck out 27 batters in 21 1/3 innings of work. 

Consistency with his delivery is critical for Howard and he knows that's where he can run into trouble with his control. As he moves forward, this will be a key focus for the talented California native.

The 23-year-old has a remarkable feel for all four of his offerings. Howard's pitch repertoire includes a blazing fastball that has clocked in the triple digits quite steadily at times. More commonly it resides around 96-97 MPH. He’s also equipped with an exceptional cutter that resembles a slider, a curveball that features very good break and a superior change up that has fade and fools opposing batters frequently.

Work ethic is a standout quality for the six-foot-three 205-pounder according to Phillies developmental personnel.  A dominant pitcher, Howard has the potential to be a front line big league starter.

Howard was invited to big league spring training this year, but has missed time with a knee injury.

I would expect Howard to open the season back with Double-A Reading, but it shouldn't be long before he gets the opportunity to test his skills at the Triple-A level.

You can keep tabs on this year's top 25 Phillies prospects countdown by clicking this link.

Friday, March 6, 2020

2020 Phillies Prospects Countdown: #2 Third baseman Alec Bohm

Alec Bohm, image- Jay Floyd

I invite you to visit Patreon.com/PhoulBallz in order to support my work and get access to material like this before anyone.  Plus you'll get exclusive interviews as well as other content you won't be able to enjoy anywhere else.  I could use, and I would value, your backing.

After entering the 2018 MLB draft as one of the most advanced college hitters on the board, Alec Bohm was selected with the third overall pick by the Phillies.  Swiftly, he made a name for himself as one of baseball's fastest rising prospects.

A collegiate second team All-American, Bohm batted .339 with 14 doubles, a triple, 16 home runs and 55 RBI while swiping nine bags in 57 games in his junior season for Wichita State in 2018. He notched 24 multi-hit games during his campaign that year.

Overall in three seasons with the Shockers, Bohm batted .317 with 33 homers, 125 RBI and a .941 OPS in 166 total games. He was one of the top ranked college hitters heading into last year’s draft.

After debuting as a pro, the righty hitting Bohm would tally a .343 batting average with a double, a triple and five RBI in 11 games in the Rookie level Gulf Coast League. Additionally, up a level with Class A short-season Williamsport, the six-foot-five 240-pounder would notch a .224 average with five doubles, a triple and 12 RBI in 29 games.

He missed roughly a month of action during the 2018 minor league season after being hit in the left leg by a pitch, but following the regular season, Bohm participated in the Florida Instructional League and was among the first players to arrive for spring training in Clearwater. 


In 2019, Bohm opened the season with Class A full-season Lakewood and didn't last a full month there before he was promoted.  In 22 games with the BlueClaws, the slugger tallied a .367 average with three homers and 11 RBI. 


By late April, Bohm moved up to Class A Advanced Clearwater, where he continued to thrive.  In 40 games with the Threshers, he sported a .329 batting average with four homers and 27 RBI. 

In mid-June another promotion came for Bohm.  In 63 games with Double-A Reading he would bat .269 with 14 home runs and 42 RBI.

Honored as the Phillies' top minor league position player last year, Bohm won the Paul Owens Award, which is given to the team's top position player and top pitcher in the developmental ranks each season. 

During the off-season, Bohm torched the prestigious Arizon Fall League.  In 19 games with Scottsdale, the 23-year-old batted .361 with six doubles, a pair of home runs and 12 RBI. 

Bohm, who grew up as a Yankees fan, is said to have a top notch work ethic and is described by his coaches as a student of the game.  His wonderful bat speed and outstanding power give him potential to be an impact bat at the big league level.

At the plate, Bohm has great at bats, drawing walks and keeping strike outs to a minimum.

Defensively, Bohm has seen plenty of time at first base, including during his AFL stint but he remains primarily a third baseman.  The dual duty simply present some versatility for the organization that could allow the team to get his highly touted bat into their lineup more swiftly and/or more often when the time comes.  

Speed won't be a key factor of this big masher's game, though he has been successful in nine of 13 stolen base attempts in his pro career to date. 

Despite early success at the plate in big league spring training this year, look for Bohm to open the 2020 regular season at the Triple-A level.  He's got an estimated time of arrival for the big leagues looking close to "much sooner rather than later".

You can keep tabs on this year's top 25 Phillies prospects countdown by clicking this link.

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

2020 Phillies Prospects Countdown: #3 RHP Francisco Morales

I invite you to visit Patreon.com/PhoulBallz in order to support my work and get access to material like this before anyone.  Plus you'll get exclusive interviews as well as other content you won't be able to enjoy anywhere else.  I could use, and I would value, your backing.

Francisco Morales, image- Jay Floyd
Right-handed pitcher Francisco Morales has emerged as not only one of the Phillies' best prospects but quite possibly one of the best young arms in the sport.

Signed by the Phils in 2016 at age 16, for a reported $900,000, the Venezuela native participated that year in the Florida Instructional League.

He would make his regular season minor league debut the following year with the Rookie level Gulf Coast League Phillies, posting a 3-2 record with a 3.05 ERA, a .225 batting average against and a 9.6 K/9 mark in 10 games (nine starts).

In 2018 the six-foot-four 185-pounder stepped up to the Class A short-season New York-Penn League.  There, in 13 starts for Williamsport, Morales collected a 4-5 record with a 5.27 ERA, a .244 batting average against as well as a 10.9 K/9 mark.

Morales wrapped up his regular season in 2018 with five solid outings, sporting a 2.91 ERA over that stretch.  He also recorded a career-high 11 strike outs in a six-inning effort that earned him a win on August 21, at home against State College.

Last year, the talented pitcher notched a 1-8 record with a save, a 3.82, a .226 batting average against and a 12.0 K/9 mark in 27 appearances with the Class A Lakewood BlueClaws. 

The 20-year-old features a repertoire that includes a fastball that clocks around 95-96 MPH, a terrific slider that dives down and away from righty batters and a vastly improved change up.  Morales uses that menu to get a lot of swings-and-misses from the opposition.

The change up was an offering that wasn't a claim to fame for Morales early last season, but as he used it more and more (coaches would assign an amount of change ups Morales needed to use in any given outing), batters on the opposing team began to wonder aloud to his BlueClaws teammates, "When did he start throwing that?" 

Walks had been a concern for Morales heading into his 2019 campaign, but he took considerable strides in that regard as part of the Lakewood roster.  He averaged roughly 5.9 walks per nine innings prior to 2019 and saw that average reside around 4.3 last year.

Coaches loved the maturity he showed on the mound last year.  Lakewood pitching coach Matt Hockenberry asserted to me toward the end of the season that Morales possesses remarkable mound presence and showed plenty of mental toughness.

The starting role is very likely where Morales will stay, as he has tremendous upside.  The sky is the limit for this exceptional talent.  Expect to see him open the 2020 season with Class A Advanced Clearwater.

You can keep tabs on this year's top 25 Phillies prospects countdown by clicking this link.

Sunday, March 1, 2020

2020 Phillies Prospects Countdown: #4 SS Bryson Stott

I invite you to visit Patreon.com/PhoulBallz in order to support my work and get access to material like this before anyone.  Plus you'll get exclusive interviews as well as other content you won't be able to enjoy anywhere else.  I could use, and I would value, your backing.

Bryson Stott, image- Jay Floyd
The Phillies' first round draft selection from 2019, Bryson Stott, joined the organization and swiftly became one of the most promising prospects in their developmental system.

In his junior season last year with UNLV, Stott posted a .356 average with 10 home runs, 36 RBI and 16 stolen bases in 58 games.  Additionally, the lefty batter that was drafted 14th overall boasted a .486 on base percentage with the Runnin' Rebels.

Soon after the draft, Stott signed with the Phillies and made his professional debut with the Rookie level Gulf Coast League Phillies East team.  In four games, he went 6-for-9 with a double, a triple and a home run.  With a promotion to Class A short-season Williamsport, Stott continued his success and was recognized as an All-Star for his efforts.  In 44 games he notched a .274 batting average with eight doubles, two triples, five home runs and 24 RBI.


Listed at six-foot-three, 200 pounds, Stott draws plenty of comparisons to All-Star shortstop Brandon Crawford, as he is more of a contact hitter from the left side that won't always try to focus on the big power swing.

Stott projects to be a plus big league hitter, as he already touts fast hands, excellent plate discipline and the ability to drive the ball to all fields. 

With quick reflexes and a strong arm, Stott is valuable on defense and appears to have what it takes to stick at the position for the long term. 

Speed may not be a huge part of Stott's game, but he is a guy that could contribute on the base paths.  Double-digit steals would be a fair expectation here. 

In his younger years Stott looked up to players like Derek Jeter and Bryce Harper.  Hailing from Las Vegas, Stott has a relationship with Harper that predates both players landing in the Phils' organization.  The two talk baseball often, according to Stott.

Expect the 22-year-old to open this coming season at one of the Class A full-season levels, either Lakewood or possibly Class A Advanced Clearwater. 

The path for Stott could be similar to that of Adam Haseley, who was the Phils' first round pick in 2017 and reached the big leagues last year.  It may not be too long before Stott is helping to solidify things in the middle infield for the Phillies.

You can keep tabs on this year's top 25 Phillies prospects countdown by clicking this link.