Sunday, June 17, 2018

BlueClaws clinch playoffs with first half division title

David Parkinson, image- Jay Floyd

LAKEWOOD, NJ-- It had been roughly four and a half hours since the Lakewood BlueClaws did what they needed to do on Sunday before they found out their first half fate. 

With a start time of 5:05 PM for Kannapolis (White Sox affiliate), who were ahead of the BlueClaws in the Class A South Atlantic League North Division standings by .003 percentage points, it would be a few anxious hours, or more, until a trip to the 2018 postseason would be decided.

Greensboro, the Marlins affiliate managed by former Phillies catcher Todd Pratt, completed a three-game sweep in Kannapolis to lock in a first half division title and a playoff spot for the BlueClaws.

Lakewood's star on Sunday was lefty pitcher David Parkinson, the Phils' 12th round draft selection a year ago.  The 22-year-old struck out 11, walked none and allowed no runs on just three hits over seven innings of work to notch his sixth win of the season.

The effort for Parkinson placed him in the top spot the league's ERA leader board at 1.07 through 11 starts. 

On offense, the team was lead by All-Star third baseman Jake Scheiner, who launched his 8th home run of this season to lead of the 4th inning.  The Phillies' 4th round pick from last year would also single later in the contest. 

Also at the dish for Lakewood, catcher Rodolfo Duran also slammed a solo homer while All-Star shortstop Nick Maton plated two runs on a pair of RBI ground outs and also walked and singled to complete a very productive day. 

The BlueClaws' terrific twosome of relief pitching All-Stars, Kyle Dohy and Addison Russ, each tossed a scoreless frame to preserve the shutout and helping the 'Claws defeat the Hickory Crawdads (Rangers affiliate) 4-0.

The BlueClaws were satisfied with how they finished the first half, but were unable to relax fully and prepare for the All-Star break as their future hung in the balance with the other game.

"It's exciting.  All of us wish Kannapolis had played this afternoon.  It would make it a lot more fun, but suspense is always good in baseball," closer Addison Russ stated following the BlueClaws' victory.

In the later contest, Kannapolis left nine runners on base including three in the 8th inning, when they began the frame with runners on 1st and 2nd and no outs, but failed to score.  At the time, the game that was deadlocked at one run each.  In the top of the 9th, Greensboro played small ball, using a walk, a sacrifice bunt and a squeeze play to take the lead and plated another run on a single.  Kannapolis went down in order in their half of the inning, losing 3-1, to drop the last of five straight losses to end their first half of the season. 

Whether or not the chips fell in Lakewood's favor, the team wouldn't have been completely let down, though if they had faced a similar result to last year, when they ended the first half in a virtual tie with Kannapolis and missed the playoff by percentage points.

"We've had a pretty successful first half and our team has a lot of positives," Scheiner stated.  "It's good going into the break knowing we came and won all these games."

Luckily, Greensboro won a few at the end of the half also. 


OTHER NOTES-

This trip to the postseason is the fifth playoff appearance in BlueClaws history.  They won league titles in 2006, 2009 and 2010 and appeared in the finals in 2016.  They have won the first half title twice before, in 2009 and 2010.

The shutout on Sunday was Lakewood's 15th of the season.  That is the best mark in the league as they have five more than the next closest team, Augusta.  The BlueClaws' 2.55 staff ERA is also tops in the Sally League. 


Scheiner, Maton, Russ and Dohy will be joined at the Sally League All-Star Game in Greensboro on Tuesday by starting pitchers Ramon Rosso and Will Stewart.  The group was on a bus to the airport to fly south for the All-Star exhibition while the Kannapolis game was going. 

Infielder Cole Stobbe landed on the disabled list again this weekend.  He played in five games this month after missing roughly seven weeks with a hamstring strain.  The 20-year-old, who was the Phillies' 3rd round draft pick in 2016, is sidelined after aggravating the same ailment and is not expected to rejoin the team following the All-Star break, according to a source.  He is expected to head back to Florida to continue to rehab the injury.  In 12 games this season, Stobbe sports a .209 batting average with three doubles, a home run and seven RBI.

PhoulBallz Interview- Lehigh Valley SS Dean Anna

Dean Anna, image courtesy of Cheryl Pursell
Lehigh Valley shortstop Dean Anna has been enjoying a strong month of June.  The 31-year-old veteran of 10 professional seasons sports a .291 average with three doubles and 10 RBI through 15 games this month.  Overall, on the season, the lefty batting Anna has notched a .262 average 63 contests to date.

In 2008, Anna was a 26th round draft selection of San Diego.  He went on to reach the big leagues with both the Yankees and the Cardinals.

Recently, I spoke with Anna about the 'Pigs' spot atop the International League division standings, being a veteran that can lead by example, which Yankee he viewed as a leader and plenty more.  Read ahead for the full interview. 


-The team's been great.  Great record, first place. What are your thoughts on the group and the vibe?

You know, the group here is amazing.  We've got really great team chemistry.  Everybody's pulling for each other.  It's nice to just be in the dugout and feel the vibes that everyone's just pulling for each other.  That's always a fun atmosphere when you're playing every single day.

-Excellent.  How would you describe your role on the team?

My role is, right now since Roman Quinn's out, I'm the lead off hitter as we speak and, you know, just have good at bats and get on base for the big guys.  And hopefully, they can drive me in when I get on base and just play good defense.  And whatever (manager) Gary Jones wants me to do, then I'll do it.

-At certain levels there tends to be a veteran guy around that the younger players can learn from.  Whether that's Jake Fox or Will Venable or whoever.  I feel like this year, the guy that can be that veteran leader is you and you can shine in that role.  Do you feel that way?  Do you take pride in that sort of thing?

Yeah, as you get older you start learning a lot more from experience and you know what works for you and you know what didn't work for you and you take a little bit of the good stuff as you keep playing, you kind of have a good idea of how to maybe help some younger guys.  You know, just kind of be a leader on the field by my actions and that's kind of what I try to do.  And if the guys want to watch me play and I'm playing hard, hopefully the younger guys see that and I know they're working hard too, but I can always be a lending hand to those guys if they need a little help or advice on stuff.

-That sounds great.  Was there anyone like that for you, eight to ten years ago, when you were first starting to break into these full-season leagues?

Yeah, I would say one can that I was around when I was with the Cardinals, Dan Johnson.  Dan Johnson's been around for a while and he'd always tell me some stuff.  He'd always say, "Trick your mind." And I always think of that.  You've always got to stay positive in this game.  There's a lot of failure and tricking your mind just to stay positive and stay in the game, rooting for your teammates is the best medicine for baseball.  

-I talked to one of the full season A level players with the Phillies last week and he was telling me that he got warned, before turning pro, that the minors can be very selfish, but he hadn't seen that in the Phillies system yet.  Have you played places where maybe selfishness was more prevalent?

Well, you know, everyone's trying to get to the big leagues.  That's everyone's goal, but you know, this is a team sport.  We play a sport for a living.  We play baseball for a living.  It's a team game and it's very important to learn the team game and then when you get up to the big leagues you can contribute to that team.  You know, I think that's a big part of winning and learning.

-Going back a few questions, you talked about leading by example.  Was there anyone you were around during your big league time that you saw that sort of thing from?

Yeah, I would say the guy that I've seen do it the best is Derek Jeter.  I was privileged to watch him go to work every day and I would just kind of watch how he went about it and just kind of learned from that and just try to follow that example.

-Do you hold on to mementos of your firsts from the big leagues?

Oh, yeah.  I've got my first home run ball and my first hit and things like that.  It was real special to me.  You work hard all your life to get up there, and when you finally get up there the hardest part was staying there.  So, that's the goal is to get back up there and stay.  

-IronPigs and Phillies fans, how do those fans compare to other team's fans that you've encountered?

The Phillie fans are awesome here.  We get a near-sold out crowd every single night and it's fun to play for them.  Great atmosphere.  It's really fun.

-Do you have any game day superstitions?

No, not really.  I just try to stick to my workout routine, but no crazy superstitions.

-Do you have a favorite minor league park or city that you've played in?

Honestly, Lehigh Valley is up there.  Charlotte was beautiful.  That was my first time playing there a week or two ago.   That was a really nice city.  So, those are probably up there.

-Was there anybody you looked up to, as a youngster prior to turning pro, that you may have wanted to emulate?

I would say Ryne Sandberg, I looked up to.  I watched him play, 'cause I'm from Chicago.  I got to watch him play, and stuff like that, so that was always fun to watch. 

-Did you play any other sports as a kid?

Golf and basketball.

-Which were you more skilled at?

Definitely a lot better at golf. 

-Do you get to play a lot with your teammates now?

Yeah, when we've got time.  Definitely!

-Who is your toughest IronPigs challenge on the golf course?

Sal (Rende), our hitting coach.  He's the best player on the team.

Thursday, June 14, 2018

PhoulBallz Interview: Lakewood LHP David Parkinson

David Parkinson, image- Jay Floys
Starting pitcher David Parkinson is among the Class A Lakewood BlueClaws' collection of outstanding hurler this season.  Through 10 starts, the 22-year-old left-hander sports a 5-1 record with a 1.21 ERA, a .206 batting average against as well as a 10.9 K/9 mark.

The Virginia native was a 12th round draft pick out of the University of Mississippi by the Phillies last year.

Recently, I spoke with Parkinson about his wonderful results this year, lessons from his pitching coach Brad Bergesen, his game plan on the mound, meeting a big leaguer while competing in Little League and plenty more.

Read ahead for that complete interview...


-Your numbers, the whole pitching staff's numbers, have been remarkable.  Almost disgusting. Just an impressive season so far.  Talk about your efforts so far this season.

I think us, collectively as a staff, are just controlling the games.  A small thing that "Bergy" teaches, our pitching coach, is just controlling what you can control.  I think every single one of our starters have done that. Yeah, we've had some bad games, but that happens.  You just keep going, just keep doing what can do. 

-Ten weeks or so into the season, how do your thoughts compare now against how you anticipated you might do in this league coming into the season?

I try not to think that way.  I just try to get better every day.  I try to come out every day and get a little bit better.  'Cause if you get a little bit better every day, after a day, after a week, after a month, after a year, you get a lot better just naturally.  I think that's one thing that I've really been focusing on this year is just fine tune the little things and then taking that in stride and work a little bit and it's been going pretty well. 

-What's the pitch arsenal for you and is there a particular go-to pitch that's been really working well for you this year?

Fastball, change up, curve ball and then slider sometimes.  I've been having a little bit of issues with that, but this year so far, my go-to has actually been my curve ball, which is my iffy pitch usually, so that's been fun to have that.  I finally figured out a good release point and I've been able to control that really well in the zone.

-Coach wise, I hear really good feedback from other pitchers about Brad Bergesen, which is cool because it's his first year doing this.  The pitching staff seems to be getting so much help from him.  Could that be because he's such a small time frame removed from when he was on the mound?

Yeah.  Absolutely.  He gets it.  He gets pitching.  He gets the game itself.  So, it's definitely good to be around a coach that gets that, who understands everything, that's been in those shoes, that's walked the path before and has been able to take you down it as well.  It's definitely good.

-Is there anything in your background prior to signing that you think helped you prepare for the pros?

Yeah.  Absolutely.  Out of high school I wasn't recruited by anybody.  I went JuCo my first year.  Worked my butt off there, committed to Ole Miss.  That whole entire path I took made me realize that it's not the end of the world no matter what happens.  There's always opportunities down the road and somebody will watch, somebody will like it and it just keeps going.

-The MLB draft is upon us.  Looking at the BlueClaws roster, there's a lot of you from last year's draft.  Share some thoughts on that day for you last year.  Getting drafted...how did you find out, how did you celebrate?

That's a hard day, man.  Everybody says it's an unknown entity and it truly is.  You never know what's gonna go on until you get that phone call.  You hear things from various scouts and then it ends up not being that.  It happens to everybody, but it was a surreal feeling, getting my name called.  And seeing my name posted up there, it was unreal.

-You smiled as soon as I started asking that question.  Was there anything celebratory to share?  Any cool moment you can talk about?  Or is it you smile 'cause it was a little exasperating?

Honestly, I'd say it was more a sigh of relief.  But, no, it was definitely celebratory.  It was something that I always dreamed about ever since I was a kid.  You know, being in elementary school, saying you want to be a pro baseball player, and all the teachers saying, "No, you have to find something that is legit." And then being able to do that with certainty is definitely a good feeling.

-When you say that, I get revenge thoughts in my mind.  Would you ever take your baseball card and send it to those teachers that tried to give you a reality check?

(Laughs)  No.  I wouldn't.  Mostly because my mom's a third grade teacher, so I gotta have respect for them.  But, it's cool. 

-You knew they were looking out for you, so that's good.  What are your thoughts on the team here?  Seems like there's a lot of good chemistry with this group.

Yeah, absolutely.  I mean, one thing-- coming in from college ball, one thing was told by a bunch of different coaches and players in different organizations, they say that it's a selfish environment and I've yet to see that.  This organization, as a whole, is a very selfless organization.  It's kind of amazing for me, being in the shoes that I'm in.  'Cause coming up, you don't know what you're doing.  I've never had a family member or anyone go through this process.  And once you go through it and start to get a feeling for it-- I love where I'm at.  It's a great organization, a great team here.  We all get along really well.  

-Excellent.  Any big differences you've noticed with the regime change for the Phillies at the top? Some guys will say they've noticed the post game meal spreads have changed.  The shifts and scouting material may vary from last year.  Is there anything significantly different from last year for you?

I didn't get that big of a taste of it.  I was in a half season at Williamsport.  But from what's I've seen it seems like they're doing the right stuff. 

-After the pitchers threw their side session today, down in the dugout I noticed there's heat maps for some of the opposition down by the bat rack.  Also some charts that show guys' likeliness to throw certain pitches.  Is that new?

That's a little different.  I never had anything like that last year.   That's one of those things that's just an extra added tool if you need it, because at the end of the day, you're gonna pitch to your strengths.  I mean, just 'cause it says this guy isn't good with fastballs low-away, and you're good with fastballs in and he's good with fastballs in doesn't mean don't pitch there.  It just means maybe there's that extra thought in the back of your head, maybe if you were having a long battle with a hitter, maybe try this because he's weak with it, if you have feel with it.  I think that's going pretty well though.

-So, is that a quality or helpful study guide for you?

Yeah.  I wouldn't even call it a study guide.  I glance over it.  You don't necessarily want to take that and try to pitch exactly to that when I go out there in the game.  I kind of want to have feel for the game and what's going on with the hitter, what kind of swings he's taking, if I'm working off that.  It's more of that back of your head, just use it here if you need it type thing for me.

-Did you have a favorite player growing up, or maybe a guy that you liked that you wanted to emulate?

Pitching wise, not really honestly.  But my favorite player of all time was Cal Ripken.  I grew up in Virginia.

-So, big Orioles fan.  Did you go to a lot of games there?

I started my life as an Orioles fan, but when the Nationals came around, then I started being a Nationals fans.  I was born in Alexandria, Virginia, which is 10 minutes down the road from D.C.  So, my family is big Washington fans for everything.

-Have you had any trouble getting family members to back you and the Phillies organization?

No, not at all.  (Laughs)  I think we'll be alright.

-Very cool. Did you collect cards at all, growing up?

 Yeah! 

-Do you still have 'em? 

Oh, yeah!

-What are some of the standout cards in your memory? 

My dad had a rookie Reggie Jackson card that was pretty significant.  Um, that's the only one I really remember, but I have, like, binders and binders full of baseball cards.

-Were there any guys you targeted to fill up pages of?

No, honestly, not really.  I remember as a kid, I'd always go to Toys R Us and they'd have like those big Topps (strip packs)-- for birthdays and stuff, I used ask for that all the time.  I've got a lot of baseball cards, man.

-Any memorabilia in the collection?

I've got a Justin Verlander signed ball.  He went through the same little league as us and when I was in 12-year-old All-Stars, we made it to regionals, right before Williamsport, and we were in Florida when he was playing and we got to go hang out with him and talk to him.  It was pretty cool.

-What impressions does that make on a young kid, meeting a big leaguer like that?

Well, I mean, when you're a 12-year-old kid, you don't really pay attention, 'cause it's like that's Justin Verlander in front of you and you're not listening.  You're kind of in amazement.  So, honestly, I can tell you that I don't remember anything that he said.  I just remember seeing him-- we watched him throw a bullpen actually, 'cause they had the mounds right there on the side of the field, like they do here in Lakwood.  So, the bullpen is actually on the field and we got to watch him throw a bullpen.  I remember that and I took a picture with him, which was pretty cool.  

-Have any of your teammates from those days come along as far as you have in baseball?

I had one teammate play college ball and then I think I had another one play college football.  I think it was just one other college baseball and then one college football.

Monday, June 11, 2018

PhoulBallz Interview: Lakewood LHP Damon Jones

Damon Jones, image- Jay Floyd
The Lakewood BlueClaws pitching staff has been leading the Class A South Atlantic League in team ERA for several weeks.  In 62 contests, the Claws' staff features a 2.62 ERA.  Furthermore, the starting rotation has been marvelous, placing four of its six members in the top ten on the league's ERA leaderboard.

Left-hander Damon Jones has had a hand in the club's remarkable production.  An 18th round draft selection by the Phillies last year out of Washington State, Jones has posted a 4-2 record with a 2.12 ERA, a .223 batting average against and a 9.7 K/9 mark through 10 starts.

Recently, I sat down with Jones to talk about his efforts this year, his teammates in the BlueClaws' starting rotation, his pitch repertoire and more.

Read on for that full interview.


-Talk to me about your impressions of the league and maintaining your tremendous results thus far.

It's a really good league.  I know we have a great rotation thus far and it's good to be a part of that. My last start was the longest outing I've had in my professional career and including college I never went seven innings, so it's a good thing.  I don't know, I really like all the ballparks in this league.  It's a great first taste of full-season ball.

-Do the parks play favorably to you?  Is that the reason for the appeal?

I mean, I guess.  There's some that have short porches and stuff like that, but for the most part, I'm getting a lot of ground balls, so I'm not really too worried about long balls yet.

-Very good.  Last month I talked with a couple of the offensive guys on this team and they mentioned they were hoping to do more with the bats, to try to help out and keep up with the outstanding efforts of the pitching staff thus far.  But, of course, the defense has been there from those guys.  On that side of the game, you obviously have a team behind you helping.  Do you feel like you're benefiting a lot from those guys on defense?

Yeah, we have a great eight guys behind us pretty much every time we go out.  So, a lot of error-free baseball we're playing, so that's really good.  It's nice to see a lot of double plays turned, some that aren't routine too.  A lot of diving catches in the outfield.  A lot of balls getting run down that probably would be doubles.  So, it's nice to have them behind us.

-Overall, this team is a good unit.  I think you guys have a lot of chemistry among the players, but how about the coaches?  Is there a good bond with those guys and are they helping you a lot?

Yeah, I love the coaching staff a lot.  (Pitching coach Brad Bergesen)'s been great.  I know it's his first year and everything.  He's an awesome guy.  I've learned a lot.  And I've tried to be my own pitching coach a bit too.  He's helped me with that.  Because as you move up in your career, you have to be your own pitching coach too and he's kind of helped me with that part of it.  (Manager Marty Malloy)'s a great manager.  He really pulls for us.  He's a big team guy, so it's awesome.

-Do you agree with that chemistry observation about the players?  Do you feel there's a strong team bond going?

Yeah, definitely.  We're a really close knit team.

-What's your arsenal like?  What's your pitch selection and what do you feel is your go-to pitch, if you have one?

My fastball's really my main go-to pitch.  I've been developing a slider and curve ball.  The slider really showed up (in my last outing).  The change up's probably my fourth offering and sometimes it shows really well, especially early in the year I threw a lot of good change ups, so I need to find that again, but, yeah, my fastball's usually my go-to.

-Where is the velocity?  Is it improved from previous seasons?

It's probably about the same from last year.  I'll throw anywhere from 90 to 95.  Last year, I think I hit a 96.  But, the fact that it's staying the whole game is a really big step for me, I think.

-Were you always a starter through your college tenure?

Yeah, I was mostly a starter.  I relieved maybe four of five times at Washington State.  At junior college I only relieved and then I started in the summer.  But, yeah, I got my pitch count up.  My command was pretty poor in college.  I mean, I always threw pretty hard in college ball, but the command is starting to get better and better, so I'm happy about that.

-Were you a three year college guy or did you play four years?

I red-shirted my first year, got elbow surgery, played one year of JuCo, then transferred and (pitched) two years at Washington State.

-What was the elbow surgery?

Flexor tendon mass repair. 

-Was that a long recovery?

It's about half of a Tommy John.

-Alright.  How do you feel your college years, the ups and downs of the injury time, recovery and all that helped you prepare yourself for pro ball?

It helped me to be mentally tough and physically tough.  I know what my body can take and I'm probably-- I mean, going through surgeries and stuff, I'm probably tougher than a lot of people think.  It just kind of gives a mindset of you can push through anything if you put your mind to it.

-Excellent.  Who do you room with here with Lakewood?

Stewart.  Will Stewart.

-At one of the levels, somebody was telling me the Phillies or their team was trying to room Americans and Latin guys together.  That's not the case here?

No, not really.  We have a couple guys that translate alright, but mostly, it's just (coach) Milver Reyes, who translates.  'Cause a lot of guys live together, especially on the road too.  So, it's nice to try to interact with them and learn the language because there's always going to be Latins in baseball.  So, if you can talk to them it helps.

-Over last off-season there were some symposiums or camps in Clearwater that had Spanish classes that were mandatory for the American players.  Did you attend any of those?

I just was at instructs.  I didn't go to strength or speed camp. 

I took four years (of Spanish) in high school.  So, I understand it pretty decently.  I'm not that good at speaking it, but I've been doing Rosetta Stone trying to learn more of it.

-You've got a couple Latino catchers here, so the communication with those guys is key.  What can you share about your connections with those guys?

Yeah, (Rodolfo) Duran and (Gregori) Rivero, they speak pretty good English, so they understand a lot.  So, it's not a bad thing.  They don't understand everything, but it's nice when you say something they understand you. I've pitched to both of them. They both pretty good.  I know they're both pretty young, but they're showing a lot of upside.

-Your rotation mates, everyone's been so solid.  Fans that don't get to come out and watch you guys are starting to hear a buzz about what kind of numbers this staff is putting up and what you guys are doing.  Talk about this starting rotation here.

From top to bottom, one through six we've been really solid all year.  I know Spencer (Howard) struggled a little bit, but when he shows his stuff, it's incredible what he can do.  He'll be back in the next week or two and he'll show that he was a second rounder for a reason.  (Ramon) Rosso's really come out of nowhere, kind of.  He showed a lot of good stuff last year in Williamsport and his cutter-slider combo has been devastating this year.  Stewart's a ground ball machine, doesn't give 'em up and if he does they're ground balls through the hole, but I've been charting when he pitches sometimes and he gets 15 ground ball outs in a game, it's nuts!  "Stretch" is really good.  I don't know- he's a very dominating force on the mound, when you see a seven-footer out there.  He really places the ball well and has a good off-speed with good change up, curve ball and slider combo. 

-Stretch, referring to Kyle Young.  Is that a widely known nickname?

Yeah, he has it on his glove too!

And then (David) Parkinson, he's one of the better baseball minds that I've seen, just talking about how he goes through pitch selection and he reads swings and stuff like that.  I can pick his brain, 'cause I don't really think about that.  Say (a batter) swings through a fastball, he'll know what to throw next.  He may not execute it all the time but he has his mind always working.  I don't know.  He's a really focused guy.

-Were there any pitchers or players that you looked up to growing up that you may have wanted to emulate?

Randy Johnson was my idol. That's probably it in terms of left-handed pitchers.  After high school, I didn't hit in college or anything, but probably just Randy Johnson for the lefties.

-Is there anybody with the Phillies you got exposure to, veteran coach or player wise, that you picked up a lot from?

I met (Jake) Arrieta a little bit.  I wasn't in the conversation, but he was talking to Bergesen and he has a great baseball mind.  A lot of guys listen to him for a reason.  He's been around the game a lot, had a lot of success recently too.  

I like listening to Gabe Kapler talk.  He talked to us a couple times in spring training.  He's very forward and knows what he wants to do and obviously it's showing with the Phillies.  He's got a good plan.  It started with a slow step at first, but he knows what he's doing.  Other than that, not really.  I didn't go to any big league games this year.

Friday, June 8, 2018

PhoulBallz Interview: Reading 1b/3b Zach Green


Zach Green, image- Jay Floyd
Corner infielder Zach Green is healthy after missing parts of a few straight seasons with different injuries and is having a solid campaign for the Double-A Reading Fightin Phils.  Through 48 games this year, the righty batter has notched a .276 average with 10 homers and 30 RBI.

Last week I sat down with Green, the Phillies' 3rd round draft pick from 2012, about his efforts this year, being healthy, what he's been working on and more.  Read ahead for that full interview.


-You look really comfortable out there this season.  That could come with being healthy, but I'm just going by your look out there in the box.  Talk about your comfort level out there and your experiences thus far in the Eastern League this year.

Yeah, I mean I think comfortable can be a very relative term, but yeah, a hundred percent.  I feel like I'm having a good time out here, like you said healthy, being able to be on the field and work on things and I feel like that goes with the confidence.  And, yeah, I'm able to put in the work day in and day out and that's what translates to the field and a hundred percent I'm confident with that.

-I feel like people that have watched you on your climb to this level have seen glimpses of the parts of your game that would be appealing to scouts, writers and such.  Maybe with the health concerns that wasn't able to be fully put on display for a lengthy stretch.  How do you feel about those bumps in the road and being able to now fully shine?

I mean, definitely not the best hand dealt as far as injuries go, but at the end of the day you can't make up for lost time.  You just have to take advantage of the time you have now.  You know, that's kind of the mindset I try to take to the field everyday.  Wake up with very good awareness of what I need to work on and just get after it and good things should happen.  That's it.  You can't make up for lost time.  You just have to take advantage of the time you have now.

-With the injuries and time on the shelf, was there ever a low point when you were really discouraged that, comparatively, it feels great to have bounced back from?

Definitely.  In 2016, when I have two surgeries in the off-season, that was a low point for me.  But, it came down to thinking, "Do I still want to play in the big leagues or not?"  And I still did, so I knew that I had to go about (my recovery) positively and get after it. 

-What were those two ailments that you had procedures for?

Elbow and hip surgery.

-What have you worked on this year?  Are there any changes in your approach at the plate?  Have the coaches given you specific things to improve on?

Yeah, not too much different.  Just little things, day to day..  Controlling the strike zone is a big thing the Phillies-- they want.  Which is good, you get on base, you win more games.  But, I think right now it's just doing damage to the fastball I should.  That's just a little tiny thing I'm working on right now.  But other than that, controlling swinging at bad pitches, pitches I shouldn't be swinging at and taking walks when I need to take 'em.

-I'm thinking forward to about six weeks from now, the EL All-Star Game is coming to Trenton and, with your good numbers, you could be back for that event.  It seems like Reading is always represented well in that game and there's several of you on this team having good seasons.  You, Malquin Canelo's standing out, Deivi Grullon is hitting great.  Have you given any thought to being an All-Star this year?

Yeah, last night my host parents from (when I played in) Lakewood were at the game, they live over in New Egypt, and they said, "Hey, you're having a good season.  We might be able to see you at the All-Star Game!"  So, that was kind of like-- you know about it, but you don't think about it, but that was one of those things where I realize if I have another productive month, it's definitely a possibility.  And that would be a really cool thing, only an hour (and a half) from Reading.  

But, yeah, Deivi's a really good catcher and hitting wise he's having a great season.  Malquin's just great defensively, I mean, we definitely should have some ballers there this year. 

-We talked last year after you got to this level and I wonder in your time here who was helped you the most to make progress and become a better player?

I really like Riggsy (hitting coach Kevin Riggs).  I think he's got a lot of good stuff.  You know, if you come to him, he's usually on the same page with people.  One of the things I've tried to do this season is have a lot better awareness of what the pitcher is trying to do.  Not just go up there like a chicken with its head cut of and just hunt, "Fastball!  Fastball!  Fastball!"  And I think he's good with that, so I think me and Riggsy talking about what's the pitcher trying to do?  Is it a good time to look off-speed here.  Those kind of things that you see at the big league level, he's really good to talk to about.  

-Mitch Walding got promoted to the big leagues recently.  One year ago, he's in this league, in this park, playing this corner spot, representing this team in the All-Star Game.  There are all things that you're doing or will be doing in July, potentially.  Does that excite you when you see that and can realize how truly close you are to making that big league dream come true?

Yeah, I mean, I remember texting him last year when I was rehabbing and he was struggling.  Just talking 'cause we're pretty good friends.  It's one hundred percent encouraging and I'm happy for him.  I think I set my alarm for 10 o'clock yesterday and checked my phone, saw that he got called up, called him at 10:02 and I caught him right before he got on the plane.  That was awesome.  It was definitely a big day for him and his family.  We played for a while and we grinded through a lot of stuff, so it was a good moment for him.

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

2018 Draft: Day 3 Phillies notes

The 2018 MLB draft wrapped up on Wednesday with rounds 11 through 40.  Here are some highlights from the Phillies' day of picks.

With their first pick of the third and final day of the 2018 draft, the Phillies selected right-handed pitcher Jack Perkins out of Stetson University in the 11th round.  This year, in his junior season, the 20-year-old sported an 11-2 record with a 2.34 ERA, two complete games and a 9.2 K/9 mark in 17 games.  Listed at six-foot-three, 218 pounds, the Florida native was named to the pre-season All-ASUN conference team this year.  Last summer in the Cape Cod league he notched a 0-4 record with a 5.93 ERA in seven starts.
Righty hurler James McArthur was the Phillies’ 12th round selection.  McArthur was a teammate of Lakewood pitcher David Parkinson at Ole Miss, before the former was drafted by the Phillies in the 12th round last year.  The six-foot-seven 235-pounder made 16 starts for the Rebels this season, tallying a 6-1 record, a 4.48 ERA with a 7.9 K/9 mark.  The Texas native’s dad, Greg, played four seasons of minor league ball in the Orioles system.
With their 13th round pick, the Phillies drafted Jose Mercado, a shortstop out of the Carlos Beltran Baseball Academy in Puerto Rico.  The slick fielding 18-year-old is a righty batter.  The Beltran Academy is the same school that produced Phillies AA outfielder Jan Hernandez.
Jesse Wilkening, a catcher, was the Phils’ 14th round pick out of Nebraska.  The righty batting 21-year-old is an Indiana native.  In 31 games this year, he sported a .310 batting average with four home runs and 32 RBI.  He was named to the second team All-Big Ten team this year as a junior.  Wilkening was a 28th round pick of the Diamondbacks out of high school in 2015, but didn’t sign. 
Right-handed pitcher Daniel Carpenter was taken in the 15th round out of Martin Luther King High School in California.  Matt Breen of Philly.com reported that Carpenter, an 18-year-old, was previously a catcher, but switched to the mound after a significant growth spurt added seven inches to his frame.
In the 17th round, 1st round pick Alec Bohm’s college teammate from Wichita State, lefty pitcher Keyland Killgore was the Phillies’ choice.  The 21-year-old appeared in 24 games this year, 23 of those in relief, posting a 4-1 record with a 2.54 ERA and a 9/2 K/9 mark.  Killgore, a six-foot-three 175-pounder, red-shirted in 2016, so this year was his sophomore season.
Round 23 saw the Phillies take a high school catcher Logan O’Hoppe.  The 18-year-old righty batting Long Island native is committed to play at East Carolina.  Not sure I need to say anything more about this young man besides these two things: He batted .511 as a senior this year and won his conference’s triple crown, per Breen/Philly.com.
The Phillies took righty reliever Adam Cox in the 25th round out of Montana State University Billings.  In 14 appearances this year, Cox posted a 1-1 record with six saves, a 2.54 ERA, a .189 batting average against and a remarkable 14.9 K/9 mark.  The 21-year-old was named to the academic all-conference team three straight seasons.  Previously a two-way player, Cox spent most of last year on the offensive side of the game, pitching in just two contests.  In 2017, as a first baseman, second baseman and designated hitter, Cox batted .278 in 31 games.  In his sophomore season in 2016, he was named to the second-team all-Great Northwest Athletic Conference as both a designated hitter and as a closer. 
Backstop Jack Conley was the Phils’ 27th round draft selection out of NC State.  The 21-year-old righty batter posted a .333 average in 21 games this year in his junior season.  Conley was previously drafted out of high school by the Red Sox in the 30th round.  

30th rounder Brandon Ramey seems to be a teammate of 15th round selection Daniel Carpenter.  The 17-year-old righty pitcher is listed at six-foot-three 180-pounds.  
University of Kentucky junior Ben Aklinski, an outfielder, was the team’s 32nd round pick.  A JuCo All-American and Gold Glove winner, prior to transferring to KU, Aklinski is said to be an elite defender.  The five-foot-11 210-pounder batted .304 with six home runs and 42 RBI and was error-free on defense in 56 games this year as a senior.  Aklinski turned 22-years-old this week.

Rutgers catcher Nick Matera was the Phils' 34th round pick.  The 21-year-old Roxbury, NJ native batted .254 with five homers and 35 RBI in 48 games this year in his junior season.

Complete 2018 Phillies draft listing can be found at this link.

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Six BlueClaws honored as All-Stars

Will Stewart, image- Jay Floyd
The Class A South Atlantic League announced its All-Stars on Tuesday and the roster for the Northern Division includes six Lakewood BlueClaws.

The team will send four pitchers, including lefty starter Will Stewart, righty starter Ramon Rosso, left-handed reliever Kyle Dohy and right-handed reliever Addison Russ.  Additionally, third baseman Jake Scheiner and shortstop Nick Maton are also on the team. 

Stewart, 20, holds the league's best ERA among qualified players with a 1.23 mark.  The Phillies' 20th round draft pick from 2015 also sports a 5-0 record and a .197 batting average against through nine starts this season.

Rosso, a native of the Dominican Republic, has a 2-1 record with a 1.44 ERA and a .191 BAA.  The 21-year-old has garnered a lot of attention this season with his seemingly out-of-nowhere, surprising contributions.

Dohy, a 16th round draft pick last year, has a 3-3 record with a 1.00 ERA and a .157 BAA in 19 appearances. The California native is 21 years old. 

Russ, the team's closer, touts a 5-0 record with 11 saves, a 0.98 ERA along with a .158 batting average against.  The 23-year-old was a 19th round draft pick last year by the Phils.

Scheiner, a righty batter, is batting .273 with 11 doubles, a triple, seven homers and 20 RBI through 52 games this season.  The 22-year-old Californian was selected in the 4th round of last year's draft.

Maton is hitting .267 with 10 doubles, three home runs and 15 RBI in 45 contests this year.  The 21-year-old was drafted in the 7th round last year.  His brother Phil is a pitcher for the Padres.

The 59th annual Sally League All-Star exhibition will be played in Greensboro, home of the Marlins affiliate Grasshoppers, on Tuesday, June 19th. 

Also announced last week were the Class A Advanced Florida State League All-Star.  Phillies developmental players that made that league's North Division All-Star roster were righty hurler Sixto Sanchez, the youngest pitcher in the league, first baseman Darick Hall, who was already promoted to Double-A Reading and won't take part in the contest, shortstop Arquimedes Gamboa and designated hitter Austin Listi.  

2018 Draft: Day 2 Phillies notes


Some details on the Phillies' activities during day 2 of this year's MLB Draft...

With the team’s 2nd pick in the draft, at number 107 overall, the Phillies selected right-handed pitcher Colton Eastman. The six-foot-three 200-pounder looked great this year in his junior season with Cal State Fullerton.

In 16 starts for the Titans, the Fresco, CA native posted a 10-3 record with a 2.20 ERA while striking out 116 and walking 27 in 110 2/3 innings pitched. He tossed a no-hitter against UC Santa Barbara in March and took a no-no into the sixth frame three other times this year.

Last week, in the NCCA baseball tournament, Eastman was remarkable, retiring the first 13 batters he faced, with seven of the first eight being strike outs.  He ended up giving up two runs on four hits in that outing.  

Eastman tallied a 2.20 ERA over his three year collegiate career.

In the 5th round, the Phillies drafted outfielder Matt Vierling out of Notre Dame. The six-foot-two 208-pounder had a solid season this year as a junior. In 54 games, the righty batter sported a .310 batting average with seven doubles, two triples, 10 home runs and 43 RBI. He also pitched in six games this season, but his production there (19.80 ERA, five K’s, six BB, five innings) is nearly not worth a mention.

At 137th overall, Vierling seems to be an excellent choice. He’s said to be a very athletic individual with some solid tools. He was previously picked in the 30th round by St. Louis out of high school.

The Phils’ 6th round draft choice was high school shortstop Logan Simmons. The righty batting 18-year-old is listed with a six-foot-three 190-pound frame. Scouting reports rave about a plus arm and potential plus power. The Georgia native might have a future in the outfield, thought others project his as a third baseman. The main critique on this young man is related to contact and strike out frequency.

Gabriel Cotto, a left-handed pitcher, was the Phils’ selection in the 7th round at 197 overall. The Puerto Rico Baseball Academy product is listed at six-foot-five, 175 pounds.  Video of him including details of his offerings at this link.

Seth Lancaster, a shortstop out of Coastal Carolina, was the 227th pick. A lefty batter, Lancaster sported a .305 average with 20 homers, 57 RBI and 23 steals in 62 games this year in his senior season. Lasik vision surgery following his junior season resolved a vision problem that stemmed from a viral infection in his cornea.  Following the corrective measure, his stats bounced back after they suffered due to the issue with his "front" eye. He likely could have been drafted last year if not for the ailment. At six-foot-one, 210 pounds, the South Carolina native tallied a .912 OPS in his four year college career. 

In the 9th round, the Phillies selected high school pitcher Dominic Pipkin. The right-hander is listed at six-feet-four, 160 pounds. At 18 years old, the California native features a quick arm and a long frame and is equipped with multiple pitches that have a lot of upside including fastball velocity reported to be in the mid-90's.

Madison Stokes was the Phillies' 10th round pick.  The righty hitter is a senior shortstop out of South Carolina.  In 47 games for the Gamecocks this year, he would notch a .331 average with 10 homers and 43 RBI.  Stokes is still involved in postseason play with South Carolina as they sit one step away from the upcoming College World Series.  

The remainder of this year's draft will get underway on Wednesday at 11 am Eastern, with rounds 11 through 40 taking place.

For details on the Phillies' opening round pick, 3b Alec Bohm, click this link.

Monday, June 4, 2018

Phillies draft 3b Alec Bohm in first round

Selecting 3rd overall in this year's MLB amateur draft, the Phillies chose Wichita State third baseman Alec Bohm.

The six-foot-five 240-pound righty hitter is said to have an advanced approach at the plate.  Scouts think he projects as an offensive force in the big leagues.  He has loads of raw power, but can also hit for average.

A collegiate second team All-American, Bohm batted .339 with 14 doubles, a triple, 16 home runs and 55 RBI while swiping nine bags in 57 games this year in his junior season.  He notched 24 multi-hit games during his 2018 campaign with the Shockers.

Overall in three seasons at Wichita State, Bohm batted .317 with 33 homers, 125 RBI and a .941 OPS in 166 contests.

On MLB Network's draft coverage, long-time reporter Peter Gammons stated that Bohm showed significant improvements on defense in the prominent Cape Cod league last summer.  Gammons also praised the youngster's work ethic.

Former Phillies All-Stars Mickey Morandini and Larry Bowa were present at the draft to represent the organization.

The Phillies will not select again in the draft until the 4th round at number 107 overall.  The team had to forfeit its 2nd and 3rd round pick for signing free agents Carlos Santana and Jake Arrieta.

Check out the media players below for footage of Bohm.




PhoulBallz Interview: Reading skipper Greg Legg

Greg Legg, image- Jay Floyd
Last week I spent time with manager of the Double-A Reading Fightin Phils, Greg Legg.  The skipper offered his thoughts on several players including corner infielder Zach Green, backstop Deivi Grullon, starting pitcher JoJo Romero, outfielder Cornelius Randolph and others.  Read ahead to check out the interview.

-Zach Green's been consistent this year.  Showing a lot of power, when in previous seasons, due to injuries, maybe he didn't get to show it off that much.  Thoughts on him?

I think just being healthy.  Getting to play steady and getting to play the field and not having to worry about "Do I have to go down?" He's just taking advantage of the opportunity to play every day and it's been fun for Zach.  Years ago, the talent was all there, but now he's getting to showcase it.  I think just him playing and being free of injuries is letting him be him and doing what he's done probably his whole life. 

-Prior to the season, you were really high on Deivi Grullon and he's done nothing but excel this year.  It's exciting to see a guy like him really turn it on at the upper levels.  What your impression of him right now?

He keeps growing as a catcher, as a receiver.  Starting to take a leadership role, kind of figuring it out.  With him, our team's starting to play better.  I'm real thrilled for him.  With a bat in his hand, he's got a knack for putting the bat on the ball.  But now he's just showing more power.  I'm real happy for him.  I got one right!

-Some of this team's pitchers have been outstanding of late.  Mainly JoJo Romero, whose last five starts have been great, the opposite of his first five starts this season.  That's a nice turnaround to see.  Can you share some thoughts on him and maybe some of your other pitchers?

Hats off to Schrenky (pitching coach Steve Schrenk), the game plans they're coming up with and the work ethic of JoJo.  So, it's all them it's all in there and I think with the weather warming up and simplifying the game plan and JoJo just being JoJo.  He's done it his whole career and I think we're starting to see the real JoJo come out.  Couple other guys: (Edgar) Garcia's really doing the job out of the bullpen.  It's good to have (Ranger) Suarez back from his hamstring and we're starting to come together as a group and hopefully good things will happen. 

-How about some of these others guys that are sidelined?  Zach Coppola's on the disabled list.  What is his situation?

Not sure.  He's gonna see a doctor in the next few days.  He's out with an elbow injury.

-The other Garcia, Elniery.  What's can you share on him?

We're just giving him-- we're working on some things.  They just put him on the DL, with turf toe.

-Cornelius Randolph, he's performed perhaps as a guy his age, 20-years-old for the first couple months of the season, might have been expected to.  What are your thoughts on him?

Real thrilled.  The way he's going about his business.  The way he's playing. The way he's practicing.
His work ethic's outstanding.  Defensively, he's played real well.  Offensively, you look at the numbers and you say to yourself, "He's hitting right at .200?!"  The at bats have been a lot better than that.  The grind-- He's only going to keep getting better.  It's a huge adjustment.  I don't know what I would have done at 20.  I mean, you don't see a lot of 20-year-olds in the league.  There's a couple that have success. I think he means more to our team than the numbers he's putting up right now.  I look for him to improve.

-Reading's usually pretty well represented in the Eastern League  All-Star Game.  With your group, do you think there could be a lot of guys in that game?

There's a couple guys that have had good years and I hope they get voted in.  The more the merrier.  I hope seven or eight of them are in there.  We have a lot of good candidates.  As do some other teams.

Saturday, June 2, 2018

Hurricane recovery instills life lesson for Reading OF Hernandez

Jan Hernandez, image- Jay Floyd
More than eight months after Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico, the island is still recovering and making headlines.  For natives of the island the hurdles and difficulties involved with trying to bounce back come along with huge lessons.  That holds true for Phillies prospect Jan Hernandez.

The thing that will stick with Hernandez the most is a single notion.

"Family is everything," Hernandez said at Trenton's ARM & HAMMER Park this week. 

Hernandez, who resides in San Lorenzo, a town on the eastern side of the island, took on a role of provider for his family in the face of devastation last year.  He had to help his parents, his uncle and his grandmother.  Twice daily hunts for gasoline to run a generator for their home went along with constant searches for water. 

A problem with being away from home during those trying times, Hernandez says, is that the family's property and any accumulated gas and water left behind was then at risk of being stolen by someone looking to take advantage of the situation.  As if things weren't bad enough, that happened to a relative of his.

"You have to know who's your neighbor, who's close to you and you can't trust anybody," Hernandez explained.  "And in those situations you have to be with your family in your house and don't trust anybody.  And that was tough.  Seriously, that was tough."

The responsibility and troubling times had an impact on the 23-year-old.  Forced to take on considerable responsibility, Hernandez matured swiftly.

As electricity and running water were restored to certain areas of the island, Hernandez, the Phillies' 3rd round draft pick in 2013, looked forward to getting back on the baseball field.  The Roberto Clemente League, Puerto Rico's winter outfit, would get their storm-shortened season underway in January, which gave Hernandez something else that he loved, besides his family, to focus on. 

The competition in Puerto Rico gave the six-foot-two 216 pound righty batter some additional time to work on his positional switch to the outfield after a move from third base was initiated last year while he was with Class A Advanced Clearwater.

"With the transition from third base to the outfield playing (in the Roberto Clemente League) helped me a lot," Hernandez said. "I was still dealing with recovery from Hurricane Maria, but those games became my main focus and I played those ball games to help my team win."

Through the first couple months of the Double-A season this year, Hernandez is looking very comfortable in the outfield, playing both right field and center field, displaying a laser arm and quality range on defense.

On the offensive side of the game, he has shined there as well.   His .318 average ranks among the Eastern League's top 10 and he's notched seven doubles, a triple, four homers and 25 RBI through 43 games to date with the Reading Fightin Phils.

Hernandez describes the strength of his team is their chemistry.  Everyone believes in one another and each of them goes hard at all times to pick up or support every player around him.  The relationships that blossom from that kind of backing are like those of a family, which is of highest importance, of course, to Hernandez.

Reading closed out the month of May by winning seven of nine games.  Hernandez recorded three multi-hit games and drove in 11 runs during that stretch.

He has played well enough to impress Reading manager Greg Legg, who has been around professional baseball dating back to 1982.

"He's having some success and he keeps growing," Legg shared.  "Jan's getting after it.  He's erasing tough games, bouncing back with big games.  It's fun to watch him.  I think the outfield freed him up a little bit too.  Just lets him play and be himself."

Being himself is a concept that includes much more than solid ball playing skills and hard work around the baseball diamond.  For Jan to be himself, he must strive and help and care and lead.

Here's hoping he can continue to do all those things as he climbs his way toward the big stage of playing with the Phillies.


For anyone interested in donating toward the continued recovery efforts in Puerto Rico, my wife swears this is a legitimate organization that's doing good things down there-- https://www.delivering-good.org/bstrong/

Thursday, May 31, 2018

PhoulBallz Interview: Reading SP JoJo Romero

JoJo Romero, image- Jay Floyd
Reading starter JoJo Romero has finally arrived.  Well, what I mean is; the JoJo Romero you may have read about during last off-season seems to be doing the sorts of things a highly regarded prospect is supposed to do after not doing those things in the early going this season.

After sporting a 7.18 ERA through his first five Double-A starts, the 21-year-old left-hander has tallied a 2.97 ERA in his most recent five starts.

This week I talked with Romero, the Phillies 4th round draft choice in 2016, about his turnaround, his team, attention that comes with being ranked highly as a prospect and plenty more.  Read ahead for that full interview.


-I just want to get your thoughts on your efforts so far in the Eastern League.
 
I’ve definitely learned a lot over these past couple months, or whatever.  So, you know, just adjusting to that and it’s a very hitter-friendly league, so as a pitcher you have to adjust to that as well.  I’m trying to make adjustments to what the hitters are trying to do in the hitter-friendly league and where the ball flies in the park too, so…constant adjustments.
 
-A lot of guys coming into this league will cite that there’s an adjustment period and a learning curve for some guys.  With that in mind, is there any particular thing that you’re trying to improve on?
 
Yeah, I mean it’s more just simplicity.  I think in the beginning, for most people in general, I think Double-A is a lot harder.  It’s a bigger jump.  Guys will try to do a lot more, but in reality it’s sticking to the basics.  Sticking to what got you there and I think that’s the one thing I’ve been doing these last couple starts, which is simplifying things and going out and having fun.
 
-The last time through here, a few weeks ago, your numbers weren’t gleaming and what you’re getting at there is that things have turned around for you over the last few starts.  Is there anything besides that simplistic approach that’s helping your improve, anything physical that’s changed?
 
Not so much physical wise, I’d say more of the day to day kind of focus in the sense of the bullpens or I’m working on certain things trying to keep a nice smooth effort and keeping the focus on what we’re doing in bullpens as well as flat grounds and small little things like that.  You know, keeping it simple.  And I think that’s what I’m able to do in my bullpens, which allows me to take it out to games and I think it’s starting to really show.
 
-With the success coming more recently, is having faced teams before this year part of what’s helping your confidence or ability to get outs?
 
I’m constantly learning.  But it’s not so much learning from playing a team already.  It’s about learning about what I can do with certain pitches and in certain counts and using it to my advantage, so when I play another team and I’ve seen them already, I know what their weakness is and I can attack it using certain pitches and using them different ways than I used them before.  I just gotta keep making those adjustments and picking up on those things. 

-Is there any feedback you've gotten from the coaches that's helping you along?

Simplicity.  That's why I've been saying it a lot, 'cause I felt personally I was doing a lot-- doing too much with other pitches earlier on in the year.  The one thing we've kind of referred back to is simplicity and command that fastball and, you know, it's basic.  So, just going back to that, keeping things simple and hopefully looking to keep this rhythm.

-There are a few guys on this team that come into the season with considerable reputations.  You're one of them, viewed as big prospect.  What does that mean to you to have that recognition?

Yeah, I mean it's nice, you get to see your hard work get noticed.  But at the end of the day, it's just a label.  You still have to go out there and perform and you constantly have to go out there and learn and make those adjustments and you have to put that to work.  It's all about results and how you go about it.

-It can't be a bad thing though, right?  You have more fans knowing your name and wanting your autograph.

It's definitely awesome.  I'm definitely signing a lot more autographs than I did in the years before, so it's definitely pretty cool.

-I've seen something from other media members when I've been around you before- I recall some guys asking you to help translate for one of your teammates.  You're not fluent in Spanish, but do you get that a lot, where people expect you to know Spanish?

Yeah, I think it happened a couple times when we first got to Reading and they asked me, "Can you translate?"  And I understand a little bit, but as far as translating, I'm not the first person you want to go to.

-Do you get that a lot, people expecting you to know...?

Yeah.  Definitely.

-Who do you room with on this team?

I room with our catcher Austin Bossart.  And on the road, it's Edgar Garcia.

-Edgar's a guy that's starting to make a name for himself.  He's been really hot lately out of the bullpen for this team.  What do you think of what he's been doing?

I mean, all his moments, he's taking advantage of it.  He's making himself known.

-How is it rooming with the backstop, Bossart?

It's awesome!  I mean, I got to pitch to him a little bit last year and since last year we've been on the same page, so it's awesome to get to room with him and get to know him better and that translates when we go out to the field too.

-You get to face this Trenton team for the second time within a few weeks.  Do you feel more confident going after a team after seeing them?

I mean I saw a few different names that weren't on the roster last time, so I definitely have to do a little more homework on that.  But, especially with the way I've felt the last couple starts, I'm starting to get in a little better rhythm and I think that adds a little more confidence especially seeing this team the second time around, you get more comfortable and get more confidence.

-Is there anybody in the Phils organization, player wise- not coaches, that you've learned a lot from?

Probably, Pedro Beato.  Every time he's around in spring training he's always talking to us, but there was one time last year in Clearwater, he was making a rehab- he made a couple appearances, and we were in the bullpen and we were talking about different pitch grips and things he does in certain counts.  Just trying to pick his brain about what his mentality is in different counts.  And that was pretty awesome.  That was probably the last time I got to talk to him a lot, so that was pretty cool.  

-I saw Jose Taveras out with the relievers tonight.  When there's starters hanging out in the bullpen, is that what they're going for?  Trying to be around other pitchers, to talk game?

Yeah, that's usually what happens out there especially when you have someone rehabbing.  You want to make your way out there, so you can get to talk to them and you can pick their brain.  But, that's ultimately why.

-A couple more things for you and thanks for all the time.  I really appreciate it.  You're out here tonight wearing an Eagles cap.  Are you that deep into Philly sports that you're supporting the Eagles too?

Aw, man!  I'm definitely starting to love the Philly sports.  Especially with the way they play, that kind of high energy.  That's something I love and that's the way I like to play, so I definitely got to support them.  I got a Sixers shirt, I've got a Flyers hat, so I'm ready!

-Perfect, man!  Were there any players you looked up to as a kid that perhaps you wanted to emulate?

Yeah, they weren't lefties though.  One of them that I watched a lot was Eric Gagne.  The whole thing was, "Game over".  That was kind of like a calling card.  So, you know, just watching pitchers like that, who were all intensity and that bulldog mentality when they were on the mound, those were the ones I liked watching.  

-I talked to him once, not in an interview setting, and the guy was so serious.  Nothing at all that gave me the opportunity to transition to any sort of fun chat with him.  Just all intensity.

Yeah.  Now imagine that on the mound with a 100 mile an hour fastball!