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PhoulBallz Interview: RHP Prospect Seth Rosin

Last summer, as part of the Hunter Pence trade, the Phillies acquired righty hurler Seth Rosin (Roe-ZEEN). Originally drafted in the 4th round in 2010 by San Francisco, Rosin had mainly been a reliever with the Giants' Class A Advanced affiliate San Jose. Now throwing strictly as a starter, since joining the Phils' organization, the University of Minnesota product, who stands six-foot-six and weights around 250 pounds, has posted a 1-4 record with a 3.17 ERA while striking out 32 and walking seven in 45 1/3 innings.

Recently, I spoke with the 24-year-old about his transition to a new organization, his thoughts about Reading, Eastern League competition and plenty more. Read ahead for that full interview.


- Last year, at the time of the trade, how were you notified you had been dealt and what was your reaction?

I got a call from the Giants front office at about 8 o'clock in the morning, west coast time, letting me know I had to leave tomorrow to go to Florida, I was in a trade. So, I was just trying to get everything in order, get my car out to Florida, or whatever, all my clothes. I had a host family, so they were really helpful with that. I was just- I knew I had to get all my stuff in order to get over there. It was a good transition and the Phillies guys welcomed me, so it was a good transition.


- As rattling as that appears to be, from that description, is getting that news also exciting, because you know a team has just dealt an established player to get you?

Yeah. It's a fresh start. All new coaches, everything, I've got to get to know everyone's names and stuff like that. It's a good start and I'm having a good time over here.


- I know that you're a North Dakota and a Minnesota guy. Not a lot of baseball players come out of those colder weather states. Tell me about your first exposure to baseball and maybe what it was like trying to excel at a sport in which it's tough to get a lot of experience in a colder weather state.

I was born in North Dakota and then I lived in Minneapolis, growing up or whatever. I went to college at Minnesota and I always had a chip on my shoulder, when I went out to Cape Cod especially, when they told me that kids from the north couldn't play baseball. So, I took that with me and always wanted to prove them wrong. I think I still take that out with me everyday to the field, just to prove everybody wrong.


- What are your impressions of the town, the facility, the fans here with Reading thus far?

Oh, it's amazing, getting 5 (thousand) to 8,000 a night, every night, is a lot of fun. Seeing the ostriches out there in center field during pregames, hilarious. So, we have fun everyday. Working really hard, trying to get as many wins as possible for the team and hopefully, we can get deep into the playoffs this year.

When you're doing well (the fans) are loving you. When you're not doing well, they can get on you. I think that's my first taste of that. It's pretty cool being a role model to all the kids that come out and want the autograph or the high five.


- What are your thoughts on transitioning from the Florida State League up here to the Eastern League?

Probably the strike zone's a little smaller, but more consistent here in Double-A than in High A. So, you just gotta make sure your get ahead of the hitters, because they'll be selective and they'll take their walks, when they can get them. Just attacking hitters is probably more important here than in High A.


- So, what is your pitch repertoire likes and what are the variances in velocity that you have?

I throw mostly a four-seam fastball, slider and a change up. Velocity, you're gonna have to ask someone else. I don't really ask that kind of stuff. I'm kind of a control kind of guy. I just try to throw it both sides of the plate and keep the ball down and a let my defense play behind me, so I just try to get off the field as quick as possible.


- You've got some highly regarded catching prospects here that you get to throw to. What is it like throwing to these guys and what are your impressions of the depth at catcher for this organization right now?

They're all fantastic. I've thrown to (Sebastian) Valle all my starts this year and I think we're on the same page every innings out there, so, and I know (Cameron) Rupp is fantastic as well, so I'm looking forward to throwing to him as well. I'm just having fun with them. They can all throw guys out, they call a good game, they block well, play good defense, so it's a treat to throw to these guys.


- We talked about you being from the northern states. Who were some of your favorite players growing up?

Kirby Puckett was, by far, my favorite player. Being a Minnesota Twin, he's a hometown favorite for winning those two World Series. The Minnesota Twins, growing up, was my favorite. I still have a place in my heart for those guys. It was just a lot of fun watching them growing up.


- Do you have any superstitions or gameday routines that you go by?

I put on my socks the same way every day. I put my left one on, them my right one. I make sure I put my left shoes on first before my right one. And I play catch with the strength coach every day before my start. Those are my two routines, I guess.

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