Skip to main content

Williamsport's Iser has American aspirations

Herbert Iser, image- MiLB.com
Herbert Iser would have already taken strides toward becoming a citizen of the United States if it wasn't for the Phillies drafting him a couple of months ago.

The talented backstop was hopeful to make progress in that regard, but signed his first professional contract after he was selected in the 23rd round in this year's amateur draft got in the way.

"I was in the process, but being drafted and all that stuff, I couldn't make it to the appointment I had, so hopefully in the off-season, maybe, I'll be a dual citizen with Jamaica and America," Iser said in a recent phone interview.

A Citizen of Jamaica, currently, Iser's family has a remarkable background. 

Not wanting to live under a dictatorship, Iser's parents, Alfredo Iser and Maria Olivero, fled Cuba for more favorable conditions in Jamaica in 1996.  A year and a half later, Herbert was born, named after his father's employer, Jamaican Minister of Health Dr. Herbert Eldemire.

"He's deceased now, but when my family went from Cuba to Jamaica, he helped my family out.  He housed us," Iser explained.

A product of Dallas Baptist University, the same school that produced other recent Phillies draftees such as Autin Listi, Darick Hall, David Martinelli and Eric White, Iser batted .280 with seven home runs and 34 RBI in 52 games played for the Patriots this year as a junior.

The lefty batter had also been drafted last year, following two years at San Jacinto (junior) College, in the 24th round by Baltimore.  He chose not to sign, instead transferring to DBU.

His parents, who instilled a religious focus in the six-foot-three 210-pounder, now live apart and are currently both United States residents, but are his biggest fans.  While dad knows the sport very well, Iser's mom, described as the brain of the family, isn't as astute when it comes to baseball.

"She'll call me every day and talk to me about how I did, but she doesn't really get it," Iser explained.  "If I got a couple hits or something she'll say, 'You got a couple home runs!'"

Iser debuted in the minor leagues in June, playing in five games with the Gulf Coast League Phillies West team.  After going 8-for-16 with two doubles, two triples and three RBI, he was promoted to the Class A short-season Williamsport Crosscutters.

In 19 games there, in the New York-Penn League, Iser isn't enjoying the same success to date.  He's tallied a .156 average with two doubles, a triples, two homers and five RBI.

Despite the less than ideal results the 21-year-old Iser doesn't feel overwhelmed by the latest level.  In fact, he feels college ball prepared him very well for the grind of pro baseball. 

"Just, right now, I think things aren't going my way, 'cause I'm seeing the ball fine," Iser said.  "I'm hitting the ball solid.  Just right now we're at the point where I need to make adjustments.  There's nothing that's too overwhelming."

While he works to get his offensive results to a more appealing level, Iser, who has garnered attention for his defense and arm strength, is able to give his game the full attention it deserves.  The Phillies have an employee, Ray Robles, who, in the role of Assistance Director of International Relations, has been able to help Iser with all the processes and paperwork involved with all the legalities and paperwork.

On top of making Iser's dreams of playing professional baseball comes, the organization is also working with him on another big aspiration of acquiring that dual citizenship.

"It's very important," Iser said.  "It means the world to me.  I look at it as they see me as a person and really care." 


For more quotes from Iser, available exclusively for patrons, head on over to Patreon.com/PhoulBallz to support my work and get more content!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Who is Your Favorite Willie 'Mays' Hayes?

PhoulBallz.com is wondering which individual who has portrayed Willie "Mays" Hayes is the favorite of the public. Hayes, of course, is the character made famous in the Major League motion picture series. In Major League , Willie "Mays" Hayes was portrayed by budding Hollywood actor Wesley Snipes, who would go on to action movie superstardom. Snipes has starred in major motion pictures like the Blade trilogy, Passenger 57 , Undisputed and many more. Snipes remains an impact Hollywood actor, despite legal troubles related to income tax evasion. Snipes was replaced for the sequel, Major League II when his busy career, and possibly the film's budget, would not allow him to return, by Omar Epps. Another budding actor, Epps had previously worked with director David S. Ward, on the film The Program , and landed the role of Hayes, who had become a Hollywood action star over the off-season that occured between the two films. Epps' career portraying athletes rol

LHP Brown speaks on recent release and his future

Aaron Brown, image- Jay Floyd Please consider supporting my work and subscribe to  my Patreon page .  Your patronage will get you exclusive interviews and other prospect related material as well as early access to all of my other content such as this post.  Thank you. Aaron Brown was released last Friday after nearly six years in the Phillies organization. Brown, the Phils' 3rd round draft selection in 2014 out of Pepperdine, was primarily an outfielder after turning pro.  A two-way player in college, Brown switched to pitching in 2017 after struggling on offense (.224/.313/.360) at the Double-A level. A dominant hurler in college, Brown posted a 13-1 record along with a 1.95 ERA in 17 starts in 2014.  A solid performer on the minor league mound as well, the California native notched a 5-4 record with a pair of saves, a 3.82 ERA along with an 11.0 K/9 mark in 45 relief appearances for the Double-A Reading Fightin Phils last season. With free agency on the horizo

Former Phils prospect Cozens stops looters in AZ

Dylan Cozens, image- Jay Floyd Please consider supporting my work and subscribe to  my Patreon page .  Your patronage will get you exclusive interviews and other prospect related material as well as early access to all of my other content such as this post.  Thank you. Last week, as he rang in his 26th birthday, Dylan Cozens wasn't celebrating.  Instead, he took to the streets in the midst of rioting to protect local businesses in his native Scottsdale, AZ. After 1:00 AM, Cozens, a former Phillies outfield prospect and current Rays minor leaguer, caught a glimpse of some rowdy happening on Facebook Live.  Posts showed violence and thievery and the former second round draft selection wasn't going to let it continue.  "When I saw what they were doing and the reason behind it, I decided to try and stop it because it wasn't right. It had nothing to do with Black Lives Matter.  It was a hate crime to go and try to destroy businesses and loot and hurt peopl