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PhoulBallz Interview: Off-season Check In with LHP Keylan Killgore

Keylan Killgore, image- @BaseballBetsy
Lefty pitcher Keylan Killgore had an outstanding season in 2019.  In his first full professional season, the 23-year-old notched a 1-3 record with 11 saves, a 3.57 ERA, a .234 batting average against as well as a 10.4 K/9 mark in 36 relief outings with Class A Advanced Clearwater.

As one of the Threshers' primary relievers, the six-foot-three 185-pounder contributed in recording a combined no-hitter in June, along with teammates Kyle Glogoski and Tyler Carr.

Killgore, a Wichita State product, was selected by the Phillies in the 17th round of the 2018 draft.

Last month, Keylan took time to answer some questions from me about his off-season, workout routine, being a newlywed and more.  Read ahead for that interview.

-What have you been up to since the season wrapped up? Did you participate in any of the Phillies' activities or seminars in Clearwater?

I've really tried to spend as much time with family as possible. I got married in December of last year and then left for six months, so I've been trying to make up that time with my wife. I didn't go to any of the off-season camps or workouts this year, but I did go last year and that gave me a great idea for how to shape this off-season.

-How long do you rest and avoid picking up a baseball? And during that downtime what does your workout or fitness routine consist of?

I only took about a month and a half off of throwing this year. When I started throwing again, though, it was extremely light and trying to lean more towards keeping mobility more than anything. Most of my workouts have been geared towards strength and flexibility. I have always been tall and skinny, putting on weight was never a strong suit for me. To add to that, I'm not crazy flexible either, so I have put extreme focus into those two aspects of my game.

-Any goals for this off-season? Like, was there anything you've tried to accomplish such as adding muscle, learn more Spanish, anything else?

I have just tried to push myself as hard as possible in the weight room. I want to go into Spring Training in the best shape that I can.

-Are you working or employed anywhere over the fall/winter months?

I decided not to work this off-season. Main reason being that I worked last off-season and felt like I could have done more baseball activity than I did. So, this off-season I decided not to work and put everything I have into workouts and my throwing program.

-What facility are you getting most of your work in at and who do you work with the most- any trainers, coaches or other players?


Luckily for me, I grew up and still live in the same city that I played college ball in. I do all of my workouts at Wichita State University. They have top of the line facilities and everyone there is like family now after my time there.

-Any big things planned or already completed this off-season? Travels or vacations...that sort of thing?

My wife and I are going to see some family in Idaho, which will be a blast. We'll spend about a week there with them and I know they have some big things planned already. Other than that, it has been nice just being home for a while.

-What do you think your biggest takeaway from the 2019 season was?

Honestly, the biggest thing that I've learned so far in pro ball altogether is that you can learn from every single person on the field. Everyone has a different way of doing something or has seen something in their time that can give you an advantage. I've really just learned to always be listening, because things are always flying around a clubhouse or a field that can help you.


***Please head on over the Patreon.com/PhoulBallz to support my work and get early to content and exclusive access to interviews like this along with content you can't get anywhere else.   

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